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UPON GRADUATING FROM THE RHODE ISLAND SCHOOL OF DESIGN IN 2001, ROBERT GELLER BEGAN HIS CAREER IN DESIGN. ENTERING INTO A TRAINEE SHIP AT MARC JACOBS IN NEW YORK CITY, ROBERT ASSISTED IN THE CREATION OF FOUR COLLECTIONS BEFORE LEAVING TO JOIN DESIGNER, ALEXANDRE PLOKHOV TO REVAMP NEW YORK BASED BRAND, CLOAK ; A MENSWEAR LINE THAT WOULD WIN ROBERT AND ALEXANDRE THE ECCO DOMANI FASHION FOUNDATION AWARD IN 2003, FOLLOWED BY A VOGUE / CFDA GRANT IN 2004.FOLLOWING HIS RE­CRAFTING OF CLOAK, ROBERT LAUNCHED HIS NAMESAKE COLLECTION, ROBERT GELLER, DURING THE FALL / WINTER 2007 SEASON. FOUR COLLECTIONS FOLLOWING, IN FEBRUARY 2009, GQ MAGAZINE NAMED ROBERT AS THE WINNER OF THE “BEST NEW MENSWEAR DESIGNER IN AMERICA” AWARD, AN INITIATIVE ESTABLISHED IN COLLABORATION WITH THE COUNCIL OF FASHION DESIGNERS OF AMERICA (CFDA).

For SS19 menswear designer Robert Geller was inspired by tribes and cults, and their use of color.
Every designer has the dream of creating their “tribe”, easily identifiable through the brand’s clothing that the “clan members” are wearing. Color is often used as a mark of recognition and traditionally even commands respect and sometimes awe. Both tribal groups that Robert Geller looks to in his SS19 collection, the Tuareg in the North African deserts as well as the orange clad monks throughout SouthEast Asia are identified through the very cloth they are wearing, signifying their appartenance to a certain social group or caste.
The designers fascination with color has been very present throughout the past seasons, this time leading him to experiment with pigment dyes and more specifically the dying of different materials within the same garment to experiment with shades and texture for more depth and more individuality in each piece.
To this effect the dark indigo hues and ashy charcoals of the Tuareg were a focal point as well as the light orange and more earthy tones of Hare Krishna monks.
Robert Geller started from the principle that “certain fabrics should never be dyed together as they will create very different colors or simply wouldn’t take to the pigment at all”, to do just that, play with different shades of colors within the same garment to create
Together with his Japanese team the designer came up with different dying processes and special pigment dyes, sometimes dying fabrics individually and even sometimes thrice before putting them together in the same garment: so that for example the body of a bomber jacket or shirt, the waistband and the closures on sleeves would have different coloring.
The very saturated indigo and violet tuareg inspired colors in outerwear and headgear, are juxtaposed with charcoal printed shirts in reference to African woodblock prints and accessorized with beaded long necklaces, adorning shirts and sweaters alike.
Overall feeling of the collection is casual, borrowing athletic wear elements such as adjustable sleeves, and featuring snaps on openings. Easily worn with confidence and maybe a certain pride these pieces are a modern interpretation of tribal wear for the Robert Geller man/ customer, who is proud to belong to the fashion tribe while maintaining his individuality and artistic flair.